THE EXETER DIGEST

Exeter Digest #13: Flowerpot Playing Fields under threat - Scrutiny circumvention continues - Kidical Mass rides into town

Our thirteenth newsletter also covers city council spending on Instagram influencers, museum-fronted property development promotion, reports on local democracy and the role of councils in climate action and a government inquiry into the sustainability of local journalism.

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TOP STORIES

WILL EXETER COLLEGE FENCE OFF EXWICK COMMUNITY PLAYING FIELDS?

Exeter College redevelopment plans at Exwick and Flowerpot Playing Fields threaten a three metre fence around public-accessible playing fields and their replacement with artificial turf. Will it change course after widespread objections?

Read the full story or comment and share.

LABOUR COUNCILLORS APPOINTED TO ALL FOURTEEN CITY COUNCIL COMMITTEE CHAIRS AT ANNUAL MEETING

Council leader falsely claims “overwhelming majority” voted Labour in Exeter local elections while circumvention of council decision-making scrutiny continues.

Read the full story or comment and share.

GREENS TAKE THREE SEATS FROM LABOUR SO PROGRESSIVE GROUP REPLACES CONSERVATIVES AS OFFICIAL OPPOSITION

Conservative loss in Topsham among significant vote share changes in 2022 Exeter City Council elections suggesting city’s political landscape in flux.

Read the full story or comment and share.

KIDICAL MASS EXETER: “THE BEST DAY EVER”

300 people took part in the first Kidical Mass Exeter family bike ride on Sunday 15 May as part of a global campaign for safe cycling routes for children, young people and families.

“The best day ever”, according to one three year-old participant. Event preview and gallery.

IN CASE YOU MISSED IT

Exeter Digest #12 was a 2022 local elections special. We highlighted a four-part series examining Exeter Labour’s campaign claims, an assessment of last year’s councillor attendance at public council meetings and an insider’s guide to the poll.

EXETER’S HOUSING CRISIS: The first part in our series examined Exeter Labour campaign claims related to the housing crisis overtaking the city.

ECONOMY & CITY CENTRE: Part two examined the party’s claims about the city centre and Exeter’s wider economy.

CLIMATE & ENVIRONMENT: Part three examined the party’s claims about climate crisis leadership, renewable energy, recycling, retrofitting and development standards as well as decisions to scrap council and city decarbonisation goals.

COUNCIL TAX: The final part of the series was a coda examining Exeter Labour’s claim that the city has one of the lowest rates of council tax in the country.

NOTES & SKETCHES

HOW TO INFLATE HOUSING COSTS AND INFLUENCE PEOPLE

Despite Exeter’s rapidly worsening housing crisis, the council continued its relentless promotion of the city as a destination to potential incomers by commissioning a coterie of Instagram influencers to flog the place to their followers after spending a May weekend here.

Go South West England, Candace Abroad and Flying Fluskey (no kidding) duly produced various “journalism-style articles” discussing the city’s “culture and history” as part of a £10,000 marketing campaign, the cost of which is being split 50/50 between the council and GWR on the basis it promotes visiting Exeter by train.

One influencer said St Sidwell’s Point leisure centre had been built on the site of a recently-demolished bus station and described Jury’s Inn as both a “4-star” and “mid-range” hotel, before offering helpful detail on how to get to each by car and where to park.

Another encouraged visitors to “hop in a car” in the city centre to get to Dartmoor, or to drive to a Crediton cider orchard, and advised readers that of Exeter’s “three main shopping centres, all based around the High Street”, one is to be found at Countess Wear.

Perhaps it is unfair to expect council-commissioned communications to adhere to recognised fact-checking standards, but whether this expenditure meets public spending value for money criteria is another matter.

Meanwhile cider must be on the menu in council meetings, judging by a year-long project it has commissioned in conjunction with the university which “explores the complex ecology and cultures of cider-making” and “communal drinking culture”.

And it’s only a 25 minute drive from the council’s offices to the cider farm (this one near Tedburn St Mary) where various project-related events are taking place.

RAMM-BUNCTIOUS

The city’s museum is the latest Exeter institution to get roped into fronting Liveable Exeter property development scheme promotion.

Top of the bill last night at the first of two RAMM-hosted Liveable Exeter pitches focussed on the future of the High Street was the city council’s chief executive.

In what was presumably a Freudian slip, the museum’s event promo page initially said he was there to explain what was being done to make Exeter a more exclusive city, before it was amended to say “inclusive” instead.

Explanations of how Exeter City Futures would decarbonise the city and the role of Liveable Exeter Place Board were also trailed, but the former only got a single mention and the latter none at all.

Instead, attendees were offered a potted history of the ways in which the council’s vision for the High Street has supposedly been persistently prescient.

Twenty years ago, we were told, city centre retail’s principal challenge was out of town retail developments, which needed seeing off with big new shopping centres and department stores.

It seems no-one at Paris Street had then heard of Amazon and eBay, both of which were already seven years old, or Google, which by then had become a verb.

It apparently took until 2007, after the council had successfully “overcome” 5,000 objections to the redevelopment of Princesshay, for the internet to become a threat to the very shopping centres and department stores the council had been promoting.

Falling demand for such facilities didn’t deter it from pursuing a Princesshay extension on the other side of Paris Street for the following decade, or from allocating £55 million to buy back the lease on the Guildhall shopping centre last year to “secure its future use” despite already owning the freehold.

Despite this the council now thinks the city centre’s future depends primarily on attracting residents and visitors.

Whether these residents are expected to stick around for more than a term at a time is not clear, but the visitor attraction bar was raised yesterday by the arrival of plastic dinosaurs in Northernhay Gardens.

The dinosaurs are being kept behind locked gates, presumably to protect them from angry Exeter residents who are being denied access to Northernhay Gardens for the best part of a month.

Adult entry starts at £12 plus booking fee for those who fancy chewing over appropriate use of public parks with a T-Rex.

Much more inclusively-priced is the free second RAMM-hosted Liveable Exeter promo pitch on Thursday 9 June, where Exeter’s future as a “garden city” will be top of the bill.

Roll up and get your tickets here.

ON OUR RADAR

FRIDAY 27 MAY // CAST A SHEEP’S EYE

Joe Levy and Konstantinos Terzakis perform 16th and 17th century Renaissance and Baroque love songs by Purcell, Dowland, Morley and others in a series of concerts in historic buildings.

SUNDAY 29 MAY // SOUND WALKS

Musician and sound artist Emma Welton is leading a series of Sunday afternoon sound walks as part of Exeter Dream Festival.

SATURDAY 11 & SUNDAY 12 JUNE // EXETER RESPECT FESTIVAL

Exeter Respect Festival returns to Belmont Park for its 25th anniversary with live music and performance, food stalls, campaigners and community groups.

ON OUR READING LIST

LEVELLING UP

The government finally published its Levelling Up and Regeneration Bill earlier this month, which it trailed as a plan to “transform struggling towns and cities” and support local leaders “to take back control of regeneration”.

An accompanying policy paper claimed the bill would give “local leaders and communities the tools they need to make better places”.

The Town and County Planning Association immediately disagreed, describing it as a “decisive shift of power to Whitehall” which includes the removal of existing rights in relation to the planning process and new powers for the government to change the system through secondary legislation and override local planning policy in decision-making.

Much uncertainty remains around the issues which the bill is supposed to address, not least those planning system reform proposals which the bill has recycled from Robert Jenrick’s defunct 2020 planning white paper.

Last year’s select committee report criticising the white paper is worth a look, as is the government’s response to the report, which it published the day after the Levelling Up bill’s first reading.

The bill’s second commons reading is due on 8 June before it goes to committee stage.

There’s a lot to digest. For starters we recommend a Local Government Association analysis of the bill’s planning provisions and a Shelter briefing note on the opportunity it presents to ensure much more social housing is built.

The reformed national system, the details of which are still yet to be decided, is expected to come into force at the same time as Exeter’s new local plan is adopted.

Development of the new local plan is nevertheless well under way, with a first draft due in September.

The importance of both these parallel processes to Exeter’s prospects can hardly be overstated. We will endeavour to keep readers up to speed with critically-informed coverage of both as they develop.

CLIMATE CRISIS

The World Meteorological Association published its latest State of the Global Climate report last week.

The report confirmed that the past seven years have been the warmest seven years on record, with four key climate change indicator records being broken in 2021.

At the same time the Institute for Government published a new report examining incoherent UK net zero policy-making which highlights a “series of decisions where ministers seem to have undermined their own climate objectives”.

These include road-building, cutting air passenger duty on domestic flights, boosting UK oil and gas production and its approval of a new coal mine in Cumbria.

Interesting IfG recommendations include the creation of a new independent body charged with forecasting the emissions impact of policies and other decisions, to sit somewhere between the Office of Budget Responsibility and the Climate Change Committee, following a model used in Denmark.

Meanwhile, a literature review commissioned by My Society considers the significant role that local government must play in climate change mitigation, following reports by the Climate Change Committee, National Audit Office and Energy Systems Catapult which all say that decarbonisation depends on strong local involvement.

It finds that people strongly support net zero policies including frequent flyer levies, carbon taxes, improved public transport and support for replacing gas boilers but, when asked about priorities for their community, emphasise issues including affordable housing, vibrant high streets, green spaces and youth employment.

It also finds that the public makes little distinction between different tiers of government, not understanding the scope and limits of each, so recommends more effective public education and engagement as well as transparent decarbonisation targets and monitoring mechanisms.

LOCALGOV POLL

Research carried out by Ipsos for the Local Government Information Unit in the run-up to this year’s local elections reinforced this lack of local democracy literacy.

Despite most people believing local councils have the most impact on their everyday lives and the quality of life in their area, more than half of Britons claim to know “not very much” or “nothing at all” about the work of local councillors or how decisions are taken locally.

Unsurprisingly, nearly two thirds say they want more information about what’s going on locally and/or more of a say in how local decisions are made.

DCMS SELECT COMMITTEE

Which is where local public interest journalism comes in, or would more readily if the £1 billion annual public subsidy that is being given to three sinking legacy local news conglomerates to keep them afloat was instead redirected towards it.

So said members of the panel giving oral evidence on the sustainability of local journalism to the commons DCMS select committee last week.

The committee gathered a wide range of written evidence for its inquiry into the challenges facing local news organisations earlier this year.

This session was an opportunity for proponents of the approach being followed by Exeter Observer, among others, to set out their stall, contrasting accountable, independent public interest journalism with a business model which commodifies news and corrodes the public sphere with misinformation, causing people to disengage with democracy altogether.

Adam Cantwell-Corn of The Bristol Cable incisively described the problems caused by the economics of ad-sustained journalism when global technology platforms control advertising markets as well as the social media which drive audience attention.

He pointed out that legacy titles are forcing journalists to produce five or more “fast food” stories a day, chasing website traffic at the colossal volumes necessary to collect what is a tiny share of the tech giants’ revenue, traffic that can only be attracted via social media platform incentive structures which favour the polarising content which supports their profits.

He also pointed out that the legacy “local” titles which are now, in the UK, almost all owned by just three companies are no longer local because so much of their content is produced by regional or national hubs, with up to 90% of their website traffic coming from outside the areas their titles claim to cover.

How could the £1 billion instead be spent? It could be used to support the development of business models which are focussed on outcomes, such as increases in trust and democratic engagement, instead of simply churning out cheap, quick, provocative content and reducing readers to consumers rather than considering them as citizens or members of a community.

Watch the session or read the transcript (session II) then join Exeter Observer on its mission to strengthen civil society and help people participate more effectively in local democracy.

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Exeter in brief
Exeter in brief

Royal College of Nursing staff at the ROYAL DEVON NHS TRUST have resumed strike action alongside South Western Ambulance Service workers as healthcare professionals across the country stage the biggest strike in NHS history.

Detailed plans for the Honiton Road MOOR EXCHANGE RETAIL PARK have been submitted for approval. Outline planning permission for the development was granted two years ago.

The police inspectorate says DEVON AND CORNWALL POLICE must make urgent improvements after it was found to be inadequate in three of nine areas including responding to emergency and non-emergency calls and managing registered sexual and violent offenders.
Its assessment found two other areas required improvement while two more were graded “good”. A new chief constable was appointed in December after the force was placed under enhanced inspectorate monitoring last year.

DEVON COUNTY COUNCIL is consulting on its draft Exeter Local Cycling and Walking Infrastructure Plan, which is already nearly six years late, until the end of March.

UNIVERSITY OF EXETER staff have resumed strike action over pay, pensions and working conditions alongside Exeter school teaching staff with dozens more strike days planned during February and March.

EXETER CITY FUTURES published the agenda for its last board meeting on 30 January, two months after the meeting was held. It says it is “committed to being completely transparent and open about the things that are discussed at board meetings”. No minutes were included.

DEVON COUNTY COUNCIL is not making sufficient progress with its children’s services since they were judged inadequate in January 2020 according to the latest Ofsted monitoring report which found that key areas still require significant change and serious issues remain.

The UNIVERSITY OF EXETER has submitted detailed plans for its 1,700 bed West Park redevelopment of 50,000m2 of student accommodation.

Royal College of Nursing staff at the ROYAL DEVON NHS TRUST have resumed strike action alongside South Western Ambulance Service workers as healthcare professionals across the country stage the biggest strike in NHS history.

Detailed plans for the Honiton Road MOOR EXCHANGE RETAIL PARK have been submitted for approval. Outline planning permission for the development was granted two years ago.

The police inspectorate says DEVON AND CORNWALL POLICE must make urgent improvements after it was found to be inadequate in three of nine areas including responding to emergency and non-emergency calls and managing registered sexual and violent offenders.
Its assessment found two other areas required improvement while two more were graded “good”. A new chief constable was appointed in December after the force was placed under enhanced inspectorate monitoring last year.

DEVON COUNTY COUNCIL is consulting on its draft Exeter Local Cycling and Walking Infrastructure Plan, which is already nearly six years late, until the end of March.

UNIVERSITY OF EXETER staff have resumed strike action over pay, pensions and working conditions alongside Exeter school teaching staff with dozens more strike days planned during February and March.

EXETER CITY FUTURES published the agenda for its last board meeting on 30 January, two months after the meeting was held. It says it is “committed to being completely transparent and open about the things that are discussed at board meetings”. No minutes were included.

DEVON COUNTY COUNCIL is not making sufficient progress with its children’s services since they were judged inadequate in January 2020 according to the latest Ofsted monitoring report which found that key areas still require significant change and serious issues remain.

The UNIVERSITY OF EXETER has submitted detailed plans for its 1,700 bed West Park redevelopment of 50,000m2 of student accommodation.

More Exeter Digest

Exeter Digest #22: Community infrastructure levy review - Student numbers - County council spending

The first edition of 2023 also introduces our new Exeter in brief section and trails PRISM Exeter LGBTQIA+ speakers, a free documentary film screening and Exeter's first seed swap.

Exeter Digest #21: Greener grass? - Council lottery - EDF secrecy - £2.2 million ECL loss

A bumper festive holiday edition also covers the nurses strike, South West Water's "sustained poor performance" and the university's gender pay gap plus a Community Infrastructure Levy consultation.

Exeter Digest #20: ICO investigates university - Stagecoach escapes - University strike - Roads dominate Devon transport spending

Our essential newsletter also covers three ongoing public consultations plus an original play by Exeter Drama Company, traditional festive music by candlelight and poetry, comedy and live carols for Christmas.

All Exeter Digest
News
Exeter empty and second homes by council tax band October 2022 bar chart

PLANNING & PLACE

Exeter has more empty and second homes than built in city in past two years

Council tax premium proposals that aim to raise additional revenue from underused housing stock might also encourage return to residential occupancy.

University of Exeter students based at Streatham & St Luke's campuses 2021-22 & 2022-23 table

PLANNING & PLACE

30,000 students based at Exeter university campuses in 2022-23

Freedom of information request reveals significant drop on last year with postgraduate students accounting for 58% of fall in numbers.

Devon County Council headquarters at County Hall

DEMOCRACY & GOVERNANCE

Underperforming county council children's services to receive nearly half of proposed spending increases

Details of simultaneous £50 million 2023-24 spending reductions not yet published as finance director cites service delivery "re-prioritisation".

All News
Analysis
Lottery graphic

COMMUNITY & SOCIETY

Council lottery operator to take cut from local charitable donations

Decision to promote gambling as "incentivised giving" plays down risks without assessing potential impacts or evidencing claimed benefits, disrupting relationships between community and voluntary sector organisations and supporters.

Exeter Development Fund workshop presentation October 2021

DEMOCRACY & GOVERNANCE

Exeter City Futures falsely claims development fund documents disclosed under FOI legislation

Senior council director puts company on collision course with Information Commissioner's Office as significant governance failings emerge after councillors and public kept in dark over Liveable Exeter financing scheme proposals.

Exeter City Council 2020-21 external audit report cover

DEMOCRACY & GOVERNANCE

Exeter City Living put council at "significant financial risk" after £2.2 million loss in first two years

Missing business plan, lack of transparency and conflicts of interest among senior council directors prompt board resignations and governance review at council-owned and funded company.

All Analysis
Comment
Co-living - discover a new way to rent

PLANNING & PLACE

Council development levy changes are insufficiently evidenced and don't meet city infrastructure needs

Exeter City Council and Liveable Exeter partners impose faulty typology driven by policy objectives while ignoring new local plan, evidence base and statutory funding statement and excluding residential and retail charges from review.

Exeter city centre retail area map 2017 and 2022 CDRC data

CLIMATE & ENVIRONMENT

Is the grass really greener in Exeter city centre?

Academic research placing Exeter retail area at top of green space table was nationally reported, locally misrepresented then repurposed as booster fuel by local politicians overlooking study's social justice focus.

Exeter City Council outline draft local plan site allocations crop

PLANNING & PLACE

Will council seek investment zone status for Liveable Exeter sites?

Government growth plans combine tax breaks with planning deregulation, putting affordable housing provision and environmental protections at risk with little evidence that promised investment zone benefits would result.

All Comment
On our radar
All topics

ACCOUNTABILITY & TRANSPARENCY ACCOUNTABILITY & TRANSPARENCY ACCOUNTABILITY & TRANSPARENCY   AIR QUALITY AIR QUALITY AIR QUALITY   COP26 COP26 COP26   COVID-19 COVID-19 COVID-19   CITYPOINT CITYPOINT CITYPOINT   CLIFTON HILL SPORTS CENTRE CLIFTON HILL SPORTS CENTRE CLIFTON HILL SPORTS CENTRE   CLIMATE CRISIS CLIMATE CRISIS CLIMATE CRISIS   CO-LIVING CO-LIVING CO-LIVING   CONGESTION CONGESTION CONGESTION   COUNCIL TAX COUNCIL TAX COUNCIL TAX   CROWN ESTATE CROWN ESTATE CROWN ESTATE   CYCLING & WALKING CYCLING & WALKING CYCLING & WALKING   DEMOCRATIC DEFICIT DEMOCRATIC DEFICIT DEMOCRATIC DEFICIT   DEVON & CORNWALL POLICE DEVON & CORNWALL POLICE DEVON & CORNWALL POLICE   DEVON CARBON PLAN DEVON CARBON PLAN DEVON CARBON PLAN   DEVON COUNTY COUNCIL DEVON COUNTY COUNCIL DEVON COUNTY COUNCIL   DEVON PENSION FUND DEVON PENSION FUND DEVON PENSION FUND   EAST DEVON DISTRICT COUNCIL EAST DEVON DISTRICT COUNCIL EAST DEVON DISTRICT COUNCIL   EXETER AIRPORT EXETER AIRPORT EXETER AIRPORT   EXETER CATHEDRAL EXETER CATHEDRAL EXETER CATHEDRAL   EXETER CITY COUNCIL EXETER CITY COUNCIL EXETER CITY COUNCIL   EXETER CITY FUTURES EXETER CITY FUTURES EXETER CITY FUTURES   EXETER CITY LIVING EXETER CITY LIVING EXETER CITY LIVING   EXETER COLLEGE EXETER COLLEGE EXETER COLLEGE   EXETER CULTURE EXETER CULTURE EXETER CULTURE   EXETER DEVELOPMENT FUND EXETER DEVELOPMENT FUND EXETER DEVELOPMENT FUND   EXETER EXTINCTION REBELLION EXETER EXTINCTION REBELLION EXETER EXTINCTION REBELLION   EXETER LIVE BETTER EXETER LIVE BETTER EXETER LIVE BETTER   EXETER LOCAL PLAN EXETER LOCAL PLAN EXETER LOCAL PLAN   EXETER PHOENIX EXETER PHOENIX EXETER PHOENIX   EXETER PRIDE EXETER PRIDE EXETER PRIDE   EXETER SCIENCE PARK EXETER SCIENCE PARK EXETER SCIENCE PARK   EXETER ST DAVID'S EXETER ST DAVID'S EXETER ST DAVID'S   EXETER TRANSPORT STRATEGY EXETER TRANSPORT STRATEGY EXETER TRANSPORT STRATEGY   EXETER CITY CENTRE EXETER CITY CENTRE EXETER CITY CENTRE   FREEDOM OF INFORMATION FREEDOM OF INFORMATION FREEDOM OF INFORMATION   FRIDAYS FOR FUTURE EXETER FRIDAYS FOR FUTURE EXETER FRIDAYS FOR FUTURE EXETER   GENERAL ELECTIONS GENERAL ELECTIONS GENERAL ELECTIONS   GUILDHALL GUILDHALL GUILDHALL   HARLEQUINS HARLEQUINS HARLEQUINS   HEART OF THE SOUTH WEST LEP HEART OF THE SOUTH WEST LEP HEART OF THE SOUTH WEST LEP   HOUSING CRISIS HOUSING CRISIS HOUSING CRISIS   LGBTQIA+ LGBTQIA+ LGBTQIA+   LIVEABLE EXETER PLACE BOARD LIVEABLE EXETER PLACE BOARD LIVEABLE EXETER PLACE BOARD   LIVEABLE EXETER LIVEABLE EXETER LIVEABLE EXETER   LOCAL INDUSTRIAL STRATEGY LOCAL INDUSTRIAL STRATEGY LOCAL INDUSTRIAL STRATEGY   LOCAL ELECTIONS LOCAL ELECTIONS LOCAL ELECTIONS   MAKETANK MAKETANK MAKETANK   MARSH BARTON MARSH BARTON MARSH BARTON   MET OFFICE MET OFFICE MET OFFICE   MID DEVON DISTRICT COUNCIL MID DEVON DISTRICT COUNCIL MID DEVON DISTRICT COUNCIL   NET ZERO EXETER NET ZERO EXETER NET ZERO EXETER   NORTHERNHAY GARDENS NORTHERNHAY GARDENS NORTHERNHAY GARDENS   OXYGEN HOUSE OXYGEN HOUSE OXYGEN HOUSE   PARIS STREET PARIS STREET PARIS STREET   PARKING PARKING PARKING   PENINSULA TRANSPORT PENINSULA TRANSPORT PENINSULA TRANSPORT   PLANNING POLICY PLANNING POLICY PLANNING POLICY   PRINCESSHAY PRINCESSHAY PRINCESSHAY   PROPERTY DEVELOPMENT PROPERTY DEVELOPMENT PROPERTY DEVELOPMENT   PUBLIC CONSULTATION PUBLIC CONSULTATION PUBLIC CONSULTATION   PUBLIC HEALTH PUBLIC HEALTH PUBLIC HEALTH   PUBLIC REALM PUBLIC REALM PUBLIC REALM   PUBLIC TRANSPORT PUBLIC TRANSPORT PUBLIC TRANSPORT   RAMM RAMM RAMM   REFUSE & RECYCLING REFUSE & RECYCLING REFUSE & RECYCLING   RETROFIT RETROFIT RETROFIT   RIVERSIDE VALLEY PARK RIVERSIDE VALLEY PARK RIVERSIDE VALLEY PARK   ROYAL DEVON NHS TRUST ROYAL DEVON NHS TRUST ROYAL DEVON NHS TRUST   SIDWELL STREET SIDWELL STREET SIDWELL STREET   SOUTH WEST EXETER EXTENSION SOUTH WEST EXETER EXTENSION SOUTH WEST EXETER EXTENSION   SOUTH WEST WATER SOUTH WEST WATER SOUTH WEST WATER   SOUTHERNHAY SOUTHERNHAY SOUTHERNHAY   SPORT ENGLAND LOCAL DELIVERY PILOT SPORT ENGLAND LOCAL DELIVERY PILOT SPORT ENGLAND LOCAL DELIVERY PILOT   ST SIDWELL'S COMMUNITY CENTRE ST SIDWELL'S COMMUNITY CENTRE ST SIDWELL'S COMMUNITY CENTRE   ST SIDWELL'S POINT ST SIDWELL'S POINT ST SIDWELL'S POINT   STAGECOACH SOUTH WEST STAGECOACH SOUTH WEST STAGECOACH SOUTH WEST   STUDENT ACCOMMODATION STUDENT ACCOMMODATION STUDENT ACCOMMODATION   TEIGNBRIDGE DISTRICT COUNCIL TEIGNBRIDGE DISTRICT COUNCIL TEIGNBRIDGE DISTRICT COUNCIL   UNIVERSITY OF EXETER UNIVERSITY OF EXETER UNIVERSITY OF EXETER  

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